Delightful Plants

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Our perennial plant specialist David G drove the sprinter to Pine Knot Farms to pick up a large order of hellebores for our March hellebore festival. I wrote about that trip last week. David is a very serious and enthusiastic hort head – this is just one of many reasons why he is a treasured […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/delightful-plants/

The Hellebores In March

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What’s better than waiting out the end of the Michigan winter is a road trip to Pine Knot Farms to pick up a collection of hellebores. After some discussion with Dick Tyler, I placed an order, and our David drove our sprinter there to pick up.  Pine Knot Farms has been breeding hellebores for a […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/the-hellebores-in-march/

March 1

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Detroit Garden Works retreats into a semi-closed state from January 15 until the first of March.  During that time we do repairs, repaint, clean, and rearrange. An over simplified outtake on of law of nature we call entropy posits that everything tends to fall apart. Anyone who has ever had a garden, a washing machine […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/march-1/

The Winter Landscape: Plant Hardiness

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Plants are very specific about what soil, light and water conditions they need to thrive. Any gardener who has moved a sulking plant around 3 or 4 times before striking pay dirt understands this. It is simple to spot a plant that is unhappy.  Figuring out the cause of the trouble can be tough, as […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/the-winter-landscape-plant-hardiness/

growing-a-vegetable-garden-in-melbourneMost of the people begin composting for useful reasons. Home composting your leaves, grass clippings, garden waste and food leftovers reduces the amount of trash you generate. Plus, compost is necessary for a great garden, and starting your own heap ensures a free, regular supply. But I think there’s an even better reason to compost: it’s captivating. In fact, once you understand the basics of how the process works, composting can be one of the most interesting and enjoyable aspects of keeping a garden.

The Right Way To Make Compost

Composting imitate and escalate nature’s recycling plan. A compost heap starts out as a varied heap of kitchen and garden “waste.” Left alone, any of these supplies would sooner or later decompose. But when a diversity of supplies are mixed as one and kept moist and aerated, the procedure accelerates. Compost matures into what soil scientists call lively natural substance: a shady, flaky soil alteration that’s rich with beneficial fungi, microorganisms and earthworms, with the enzymes and acids these life-forms release as they multiply. Adding compost to garden soil boost up its water-holding capacity refreshes the soil food mesh and offers a buffet of plant nutrients. Compost also has material that increases plants’ ability to counter to challenges from insects and diseases.
Initially a new compost heap can be a quick, easy project. But new composters feel upset as they struggle to learn further about how the process works — a comprehensible dilemma since there is a wealth of information accessible about composting and not one, absolute “right way” to do it. As we take a close look at 5 basic composting essentials, it’s obvious that the world of composting is rarely black and white — or shall we say brown and green? At the same time, composting is much easier than what you might have heard.

1. Balancing ingredients is not obligatory: To facilitate compost decompose swiftly, equilibrium of “two parts brown to one part green” is frequently spoken as composting gospel, but in fact, and keeping an impartial ratio is simply an option. (Dry materials, such as leaves, pine needles and dead plants, are often considered “browns,” while wetter materials, such as grass clippings and kitchen waste, are considered “greens.”) It’s not that balancing browns and greens is incorrect; it purely makes home composting more complex than it needs to be. You can mound up all your organic substance without worrying at all about greens and browns, and it will still mature into compost.

2. Good compost can be either hot or cold: Many people who cautiously run their compost heaps for a balance of components are trying to create hot compost, which heats up or “cooks” as the supplies decompose. Hot compost is the best type of compost to create, but it’s not better than compost that decomposes slowly without heating up.

3. Turning compost is not compulsory: Most books advise that heaps will not get sufficient oxygen if they are not turned. This may be right of a heap which has been kept too wet, but mainly compost heaps exposes them as they shrink. Better reasons to turn compost comprise getting a good combination of supplies, determining dry pockets in need of moisture, and convincing your interests as to what’s occurring in your heap. And, as the composting procedure proceeds and the supplies becomes extra delicate, turning and mixing breaks them into smaller pieces, which helps push almost-done compost to full development.

4. You can Compost unhealthy or weedy plants: Many professionals advise keeping seed-bearing weeds and unhealthy plants out of the compost mound so as not to reintroduce them into your garden. This makes sense, but what are you supposed to do with the stuff? I propose giving these bad boys their own heap. Later on, after musty squash vines and seed-bearing crabgrass cuttings have been given a few months to contract to a more convenient size, you can cook the half-done compost to kill diseases and weed seeds.

5. You can securely compost stock manure: This biologically active material is a terrific soil amendment, and composting stock manure makes it safe to use in the garden. You should use caution with animal manures since many do contain diarrhea-inducing E. coli bacteria, but creating and using manure-enriched compost won’t make you sick unless you’re not careful or annoyed.

If you’re wondering where to start a landscape designing, look no farther than your front yard. It’s the primary thing that you see pouring up to your house, and you can fascinate your guests before they enter your home. Just consider that curb appeal is essential, but no matter how pretty your landscape design is, it has to be functional. When it is time to gardening, adjust your soil by adding natural substance such as lightly torn pine bark, peat moss, mushroom compost or leaf mold before setting out plants. Loose, fertile soil will encourage root growth on new plantings and allow them to become established quickly. Clearly define your turf and bed lines. First use a garden hose to lay out your bed lines then use orange spray paint to mark the lines. Your backyard should be an outside living part to have. If you want privacy, put in some wooden fencing or large shrubs around the perimeter to create walls.

All gardener desires to create best compost, and experience is the best teacher. Just know this: you cannot fail, because compost knows what to do. Trust the composting method, chase nature’s lead, and things will grow up immense in the end.

Check out our video:

How To Make Superior Compost was first seen on http://www.johnfrenchlandscapes.com.au

http://www.johnfrenchlandscapes.com.au/how-to-make-superior-compost/

growing-a-vegetable-garden-in-melbourneMost of the people begin composting for useful reasons. Home composting your leaves, grass clippings, garden waste and food leftovers reduces the amount of trash you generate. Plus, compost is necessary for a great garden, and starting your own heap ensures a free, regular supply. But I think there’s an even better reason to compost: it’s captivating. In fact, once you understand the basics of how the process works, composting can be one of the most interesting and enjoyable aspects of keeping a garden.

The Right Way To Make Compost

Composting imitate and escalate nature’s recycling plan. A compost heap starts out as a varied heap of kitchen and garden “waste.” Left alone, any of these supplies would sooner or later decompose. But when a diversity of supplies are mixed as one and kept moist and aerated, the procedure accelerates. Compost matures into what soil scientists call lively natural substance: a shady, flaky soil alteration that’s rich with beneficial fungi, microorganisms and earthworms, with the enzymes and acids these life-forms release as they multiply. Adding compost to garden soil boost up its water-holding capacity refreshes the soil food mesh and offers a buffet of plant nutrients. Compost also has material that increases plants’ ability to counter to challenges from insects and diseases.
Initially a new compost heap can be a quick, easy project. But new composters feel upset as they struggle to learn further about how the process works — a comprehensible dilemma since there is a wealth of information accessible about composting and not one, absolute “right way” to do it. As we take a close look at 5 basic composting essentials, it’s obvious that the world of composting is rarely black and white — or shall we say brown and green? At the same time, composting is much easier than what you might have heard.

1. Balancing ingredients is not obligatory: To facilitate compost decompose swiftly, equilibrium of “two parts brown to one part green” is frequently spoken as composting gospel, but in fact, and keeping an impartial ratio is simply an option. (Dry materials, such as leaves, pine needles and dead plants, are often considered “browns,” while wetter materials, such as grass clippings and kitchen waste, are considered “greens.”) It’s not that balancing browns and greens is incorrect; it purely makes home composting more complex than it needs to be. You can mound up all your organic substance without worrying at all about greens and browns, and it will still mature into compost.

2. Good compost can be either hot or cold: Many people who cautiously run their compost heaps for a balance of components are trying to create hot compost, which heats up or “cooks” as the supplies decompose. Hot compost is the best type of compost to create, but it’s not better than compost that decomposes slowly without heating up.

3. Turning compost is not compulsory: Most books advise that heaps will not get sufficient oxygen if they are not turned. This may be right of a heap which has been kept too wet, but mainly compost heaps exposes them as they shrink. Better reasons to turn compost comprise getting a good combination of supplies, determining dry pockets in need of moisture, and convincing your interests as to what’s occurring in your heap. And, as the composting procedure proceeds and the supplies becomes extra delicate, turning and mixing breaks them into smaller pieces, which helps push almost-done compost to full development.

4. You can Compost unhealthy or weedy plants: Many professionals advise keeping seed-bearing weeds and unhealthy plants out of the compost mound so as not to reintroduce them into your garden. This makes sense, but what are you supposed to do with the stuff? I propose giving these bad boys their own heap. Later on, after musty squash vines and seed-bearing crabgrass cuttings have been given a few months to contract to a more convenient size, you can cook the half-done compost to kill diseases and weed seeds.

5. You can securely compost stock manure: This biologically active material is a terrific soil amendment, and composting stock manure makes it safe to use in the garden. You should use caution with animal manures since many do contain diarrhea-inducing E. coli bacteria, but creating and using manure-enriched compost won’t make you sick unless you’re not careful or annoyed.

If you’re wondering where to start a landscape designing, look no farther than your front yard. It’s the primary thing that you see pouring up to your house, and you can fascinate your guests before they enter your home. Just consider that curb appeal is essential, but no matter how pretty your landscape design is, it has to be functional. When it is time to gardening, adjust your soil by adding natural substance such as lightly torn pine bark, peat moss, mushroom compost or leaf mold before setting out plants. Loose, fertile soil will encourage root growth on new plantings and allow them to become established quickly. Clearly define your turf and bed lines. First use a garden hose to lay out your bed lines then use orange spray paint to mark the lines. Your backyard should be an outside living part to have. If you want privacy, put in some wooden fencing or large shrubs around the perimeter to create walls.

All gardener desires to create best compost, and experience is the best teacher. Just know this: you cannot fail, because compost knows what to do. Trust the composting method, chase nature’s lead, and things will grow up immense in the end.

Check out our video:

How To Make Superior Compost was first seen on http://www.johnfrenchlandscapes.com.au

Ornament In The Winter Landscape

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Though a landscape that is striking in all of the seasons largely depends on the confluence of a great design, interesting hard scape and thoughtful choices of plant material, I would venture to say that ornament in the landscape plays an especially vital role in our winter. The plants are welcome to be the star […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/ornament-in-the-winter-landscape/

The Winter Garden: From Inside Out

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It stands to reason that the winter landscape should provide interesting views from indoors.  Even if you are a dedicated a snow boarder, snow shoe-er, skier, snow man builder, or dog walker, there are those winter days that keep everyone wanting to be indoors. The landscape view out the windows needs to be a view […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/the-winter-garden-from-inside-out/

The Winter Landscape: Gray Days

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Michigan winter weather can be fiercely inhospitable and miserably cold, but the vast majority of the days will be some listless shade of gray. As in garden variety gray, moody gray, or good and plenty dreary gray. Giving a name to the gray of the day is where we are at. For the past week, […]

from Blog – Dirt Simple http://deborahsilver.com/blog/the-winter-landscape-gray-days/

How To Design A Front Yard Vegetable Garden

growing-a-vegetable-garden-in-melbourneFront yard vegetable gardens are an increasingly popular move by homeowners and health enthusiasts alike. In Melbourne VIC, sustainable gardening is really catching on. There are several advantages to having a front yard vegetable garden, such as sustainable eating and farm-friendly products. But how can you incorporate a front yard vegetable garden with your current landscape design? Are there specialty garden designers available to help? This guide can help you successfully design the front yard vegetable garden of your dreams.

Landscape Designer in the City

According to the City of Melbourne, it is easy to create a beautiful garden when:

• Water is conserved
• Plants are used to not only sustain ourselves, but to provide food and shelter for natural wildlife
• Our gardens reduce the use of chemicals in the soil
• Compost is used to prevent the amount of waste going to landfills
So how can a beautiful garden be achieved in Melbourne VIC? A lot of residents live in smaller complexes or homes with little front yard space. But you don’t need to be a professional landscape designer to design a front yard vegetable garden. Garden designers will recommend some of their favorite tricks of the trade to help you create a unique and naturally appealing front yard kitchen.

Make your Edibles Blend In

By incorporating a lot of herbs in your front yard garden, you can create a natural effect that will bring a lot of curb appeal. Herbs such as basil and fennel offer green, leafy treats that give your small farm a more garden-like visage. Many edibles, such as vegetables and fruits, can stick out, especially when you are planting them to be sustainable. Many root vegetables are planted in rows, making good use of the soil. However, this may be an unappealing visual for those walking past the front of your house. To contribute to a green and leafy environment, disguise your edibles by parsing out herbs and other vegetables that blend in.

grow-tomatoe-in-melbourneAccording to garden designers, plants such as artichoke and sage create a great natural appearance. They sprout leaves and flowers that will make your front yard look like a regular and green-rich garden.
Add succulents throughout your garden as well, which will provide a burst of color and natural beauty to your front yard kitchen. Since it’s often sunny in Melbourne VIC, your succulents will bloom quickly and happily.

Reclaimed Woods and Metals

Another landscape design technique that’s rising in popularity is the use of reclaimed wood, galvanized steel, or corrugated metal to section off parts of your garden. Add a ring of corrugated steel throughout your gardens, where your leafy green herbs and veggies will sprout up and pour over the top. This gives your front yard an urban yet rustic appeal, which will make passersby do a double take when visiting the front of your house.

Make sure to interchange your vegetables and herbs with leafy crops, which can add texture and depth to your front yard garden. Edibles such as kale, lettuce, red mustard, and arugula offer great natural leaves, which fold over the side of your rustic metal or reclaimed wood designs.

 

How To Design A Front Yard Vegetable Garden was first seen on http://www.johnfrenchlandscapes.com.au